Thursday, December 3, 2015

A Moment from "Reign"



Reign  is a captivating TV series. Buried within Season 1 Episode 15 is a little vignette (at 10:26) that would make a splendid GIF meme. Although set in the mid-1500s, it is profoundly symbolic of our times.

The King of France has killed a prostitute, and disposal of the body is discussed by the Queen and the much younger official mistress, who is anxious to report the crime. The Queen says,

The King already knows. Who else would we tell?

There you have it. We live under a corrupt reign that really is unacceptable, although we seem to be accepting it. A lot of things need to be reported, if only there were an omnipotent parent to make everything all right.

But when corruption lives in the judges, the police, the legislature (to name just a few), we are in the medieval castle with someone they killed, and justice is not within reach.

The King already knows. Who else would we tell?

Friday, November 29, 2013

Trichomes and Non-Newtonian Fluid

-->Trichomes – where the resin is on a cannabis plant


 
-->

Typically, liquids take on the shape of the container they are poured into. We call these ‘normal liquids’ Newtonian fluids. But some fluids don’t follow this rule. We call these ‘strange liquids’ non-Newtonian fluids.



Weird coincidence



Superimposed on the magazine page: Drawings by Duke Andrews, sent to Salon: A Journal of Aesthetics in 1986 or 87

The magazine page: Scientific American, July-August 1995. The caption of the drawing says, "An embedding diagram (with a 0.02 percent probability) illustrating the quantum foam thought to reside in the singularity inside a black hole. From Black Holes and Time Warps"

Animated: Non-Newtonian Fluid in motion

Still picture - more Non-Newtonian Fluid

YouTube - One minute 18 seconds of Non-Newtonian Fluid on a Speaker Cone

Question: How did Duke Andrews know about this in the 1980s?



Suspect and Bacchus

Top and Bottom - Boston bombing suspect
Middle - Bacchus, by Caravaggio

Friday, March 29, 2013

Vicarious Body Painting


When was I was into vicarious body-painting? Seems like it would have been the early '70s. I think this one was the very first. The originally glossy paper looks like it's been around for a while.

Actually I think this phase lasted about two days, so I wouldn't want to guess what order the other alterations were made in. I think I just paged through magazines until an alteration suggested itself.


 The next one is supposed to be fire. The marker ink faded, or wasn't very good in the first place, apparently.

I hope this is recognizable as a skiier. There is a temptation to touch up these pictures for clarity. But no.

Most men, given a choice -- armpit hair or candidiasis? -- would probably choose the yeast infection. I wish I had a dollar for every time some guy has made a snarky remarky about braided armpits.

The July 1977 issue of Oui magazine contained pictures that looked strangely familiar. Some Italian named Chiaro Scuro did the art, and the exhibit consisted of the live models showing it off, and two of the “canvasses” were kidnaped, and it's an amusing little spoof.
More recently, someone has been painting shoes on feet and no, I don't know where this came from. But I do think there ought to have been a sock on the one in the middle. Does anyone really wear that style of shoes without socks?



Sunday, January 31, 2010

Birds Make Flowers Bloom







This painting, "Joshua Blossom Dreaming" was inspired by a photo supplied by my friend Lupe Lightning Turtle. Here's Lupe:

"Joshua trees don't bloom every year. Sometimes they skip a year or two. When they bloom it's usually around March or early April. Before the bud opens, it always has faint purple on the underside of the petals. As the blossom opens up fully and the petals spread, they are a beautiful creamy white.
"The picture was taken of a branch of a Joshua tree that was hanging very low to the ground, and the top of the branch with the blossom was pointed head-on directly at the camera. That particular tree stands in the area inside the circle driveway in front of my cabin. That year, an unusual number of birds were perching on that tree early in the morning, waiting for me to scatter bird seed on the driveway and also for a turn at the bird feeder. In January, the tree was full of birds singing and chirping all day long.
"One day I picked up this book that mentioned something about the reason you don't hear birds singing in the wintertime. Their theory being that birds serve a purpose by helping trees to blossom with their singing in the spring. 'Aha!', I said to myself. 'I can test this theory out right here.'
"Come February, as I was driving out on my way to town, I passed in front of the Joshua tree and, lo and behold, there at eye level was that beautiful blossom staring me right in my face. I looked up and sure enough some of the other branches had started to bloom. None of the other trees in the area had any blossoms. That was the blossom that proved to me the theory of how birds singing help to wake up the blossom."

Monday, December 14, 2009